Prescription for Hillary: Be Like Ike

By Barbara A. Perry, co-editor of 42: Inside the Presidency of Bill Clinton

xb22035b2e5ddb361eb23f372d6981299-jpg-pagespeed-ic-ckobryzcgn
Source: Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library

In the fall of 1955 President Dwight Eisenhower, once a four-pack-a-day smoker, had a brush with the Grim Reaper. While vacationing at his mother-in-law’s Denver home, Ike suffered a serious heart attack that landed him in an oxygen tent at Fitzsimons Army Hospital. For seven weeks he was confined to the facility, treated by a team of physicians, in consultation with famed Harvard-trained cardiologist Paul Dudley White, who flew in from Boston. Unlike his former commander-in-chief Franklin Roosevelt, at death’s door during the 1944 reelection campaign, Eisenhower insisted that the public know about his condition. “Tell the truth, the whole truth; don’t try to conceal anything,” the president instructed Press Secretary James Hagerty, who arrived on the scene from Washington the night after his boss was stricken. Following some confusion and misleading reports over the president’s condition in the initial hours of the crisis, Hagerty and Dr. White held informative news conferences to update the nation on the chief executive’s treatment and prognosis.


“Tell the truth, the whole truth; don’t try to conceal anything,” the president instructed Press Secretary James Hagerty, who arrived on the scene from Washington the night after his boss was stricken.


Continue reading “Prescription for Hillary: Be Like Ike”

Prescription for Hillary: Be Like Ike

Robert J. Sternberg on How to Produce Students Who Can Change the World

80140100968370lQ & A with Robert J. Sternberg was published in the Chronicle of Higher Education (paywalled) on September 15. Dan Berrett of the Chronicle writes of Sternberg, “Over an extensive career, he has challenged orthodoxies on admissions, standardized testing, and academic culture. . . . In his new book, What Universities Can Be: A New Model for Preparing Students for Active Concerned Citizenship and Ethical Leadership, Sternberg synthesizes his research and evolving thinking on intelligence, creativity, common sense, wisdom, and leadership. . . . He proposes a new model that prepares students for what he calls ‘active concerned citizenship and ethical leadership,’ or ‘Accel.’ That means emphasizing access over exclusivity, he says, and cultivating broad abilities, like creativity, wisdom, and practical thinking, instead of narrow ones like memory.”

A few short excerpts of the interview follow: Continue reading “Robert J. Sternberg on How to Produce Students Who Can Change the World”

Robert J. Sternberg on How to Produce Students Who Can Change the World

Award-winning books in 2016 thus far

 

With the start of the academic year, let’s take a moment to recognize the many Cornell University Press titles that have received awards so far in 2016:

Honor, Vengeance, and Social Trouble: Pardon Letters in the Burgundian Low Countries Peter Arnade and Walter Prevenier
Honorable Mention, Phyllis Goodhart Gordan Book Prize (Renaissance Society of America)

Public Housing Myths: Perception, Reality, and Social Policy
Edited by Nicholas Dagen Bloom, Fritz Umbach, and Lawrence J. Vale
Winner, International Planning History Society Book Award

Islam in Saudi Arabia 
David Commins
Winner, Foreign Affairs 2015 Best Book of the Year (Middle East)

“No One Helped”: Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy 
Marcia M. Gallo
Winner, Lambda Literary Award for LGBT Nonfiction
Winner, Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction (Publishing Triangle)

Whose Bosnia? Nationalism and Political Imagination in the Balkans, 1840–1914
Edin Hajdarpasic
Winner, Joseph Rothschild Prize in Nationalism and Ethnic Studies (Association for the Study of Nationalities) Continue reading “Award-winning books in 2016 thus far”

Award-winning books in 2016 thus far

Cornell University Press Welcomes Martyn Beeny

img_1033Cornell University Press is proud to announce the appointment of Martyn Beeny to the position of marketing director. Martyn Beeny comes to Cornell University Press with more than a decade of experience in scholarly publishing, most recently at the University of Nebraska Press and, prior to that, at the South Dakota State Historical Society Press.

Beeny begins work at Cornell University Press in the middle of October. He will oversee marketing campaigns for more than one hundred titles per year in such diverse fields as anthropology, health care policy, higher education, history, labor relations, life sciences, politics and international relations, urban studies, and most recently Southeast Asian studies under the new collaboration with Cornell’s Southeast Asia Program (SEAP).

Throughout his publishing career Beeny has taken an innovative and collaborative approach to marketing and selling books, and in his new position he will work to identify new markets and platforms for the Press to further enhance its global outreach efforts.

“The book publishing world is constantly in motion and we are in the midst of what appears to be an exciting and dramatic period,” said Beeny. “As such, innovation, particularly in marketing, is crucial. Cornell University Press’s well-established, rich history and tradition has provided it with a stable platform to bring new ideas and vision to the marketing of CUP’s titles and brand. I am excited to help magnify Cornell’s prominent role as a dynamic leader of university presses, and the book publishing world at large.”

“We are excited to have Martyn Beeny joining our marketing team,” said director Dean Smith. “Martyn believes in pushing the boundaries of traditional book marketing and brings an established track record for success. He has the inventive techniques and bold approach necessary to help drive CUP forward.”

Beeny earned both his PhD in History and BA in American Studies at the University of Kent at Canterbury.

Cornell University Press Welcomes Martyn Beeny

The Southeast Asian Studies Program and Cornell University Press Announce New Publishing Collaboration

Unknown

ITHACA, NY, Aug. 31 — Cornell University’s Southeast Asian Studies Program (SEAP) and Cornell University Press officially announce an exciting new collaboration for the publication of books and the journal Indonesia. SEAP Publications will maintain its distinct and prestigious profile while becoming an imprint of the CUP publishing program.

“It 80140100606170Lis an honor for me as Director of SEAP to help sign into being this new collaborative venture between SEAP and CUP Press,” said SEAP Director Kaja M. McGowan. “I am grateful to professor Tamara Loos for helping to bring this exciting opportunity to fruition, and for the generous engagement from the get-go with Dean John Smith, Director of CUP. SEAP Publications has long promoted the publication of high quality scholarship on Southeast Asia through the journal Indonesia and its book publications.”

The mission of SEAP Publications is to make available to an interested international clientele—including academics, business leaders, governmental agencies, and NGOs—a wide variety of scholarly and language texts at the lowest possible cost. Continue reading “The Southeast Asian Studies Program and Cornell University Press Announce New Publishing Collaboration”

The Southeast Asian Studies Program and Cornell University Press Announce New Publishing Collaboration

Ralph Frerichs on the UN’s responsibility for Haiti cholera epidemic

Last week, after five years of denial, the UN acknowledged a role in the outbreak of cholera in Haiti. Writes Cornell Press author Ralph R. Frerichs in an op-ed published today in the Boston Globe: “Unforgivably, the UN has not supplied enough funding to keep the mobile teams active and the supplies available to smother the epidemic”—something that Frerichs argues lies well within the realm of possibility. In this essay, he outlines what must be done now to save lives still at risk during this ongoing health crisis.

Read an excerpt of Ralph R. Frerichs’s book Deadly River: Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti on our blog. More information on on this title can be found on our website.

Ralph Frerichs on the UN’s responsibility for Haiti cholera epidemic

Deadly River: Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti

80140100094160LNearly six years after Haiti’s catastrophic cholera epidemic, the United Nations has acknowledged its role in the initial outbreak. Not as widely known is the disturbing story of political intrigue as the crisis unfolded, and how the world’s wealthy nations, nongovernmental agencies, and international institutions responded when their interests clashed with the needs of the world’s most vulnerable people.

Ralph R. Frerich’s Deadly River: Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti, published this spring from Cornell University Press, tells this story through the eyes of disease detective Renaud Piarroux, who was sent by the Haitian government and French embassy to investigate the mystery surrounding the epidemic’s origins. A short excerpt follows.

It was Monday morning, November 22, 2010. A CDC [US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] team was presenting the results of an epidemiological case-control study. The researchers had set out to identify risk factors for contracting cholera in the town of Petite-Rivière-de-l’Artibonite, in the heart of the Artibonite valley. Did cholera come from food—perhaps brought from a coastal city? Did it come from kitchen practices or river water?

The findings were limited to people in that one community, although others in the valley region might well have responded in a similar manner. The investigators interviewed forty-nine people with cholera, asking about their diet and hygienic precautions taken in the three days before onset of their illness. They asked the same questions of ninety-eight healthy people from neighboring households—the “controls.” By linking the responses of the cases and controls statistically, the CDC team could estimate the relative risk of cholera associated with the factors of interest.


For a moment, Piarroux’s  mind channeled Sherlock Holmes and his classic deduction about the dog that did not bark in the night.


The presentation offered two main—and rather puzzling—conclusions: drinking untreated water from the Artibonite River was not a risk factor; consuming meat and raw vegetables protected people from cholera. These unexpected results created quite a buzz in the room. Piarroux sat quietly listening to the presentation, reflecting on what he had learned about the likely dynamics of Haiti’s cholera epidemic from his field investigation. For a moment, his mind channeled Sherlock Holmes and his classic deduction about the dog that did not bark in the night. Holmes and a detective colleague at Scotland Yard were addressing a mystery that involved the disappearance of a famous horse the night before an important race and the apparent murder of its trainer. Continue reading “Deadly River: Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti”

Deadly River: Cholera and Cover-Up in Post-Earthquake Haiti

Launch of Cornell University Press content on UPSO

ITHACA, NY – Cornell University Press is pleased to announce it will be partnering with Oxford University Press to load its scholarly monograph content on the University Press Scholarship Online (UPSO) platform to take advantage of a fully enabled XML environment with the cutting-edge search and discovery functionality that has marked the ongoing success of Oxford Scholarship Online (OSO). The official launch date begins today and can be accessed at this link: http://cornell.universitypressscholarship.com.

Speaking on the launch of Cornell Scholarship Online, Dean Smith, the Press’s Director, said: “Cornell University Press is excited to join UPSO and benefit from an innovative model that offers new features for the reader and leverages a global approach to sales. We are honored to be among this prestigious group of publishers.”

Niko Pfund, President of Oxford University Press USA, added that “an alliance between Cornell University Press and OUP seems only natural. From Costa Rican birds to lessons for beekeepers, from books on Eastern European nationalism to colonial American life, Cornell’s program is tightly focused yet never predictable, and I’m delighted to welcome Cornell authors, books, and colleagues to the UPSO fold.” Continue reading “Launch of Cornell University Press content on UPSO”

Launch of Cornell University Press content on UPSO

Five Reasons Some GOP Women Will Vote for Hillary

By Barbara A. Perry, co-editor of 42: Inside the Presidency of Bill Clinton

Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 4.48.04 PM.png
Jennifer Pierotti Lim (r), Director of Health Policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, founded the volunteer group Republican Women for Hillary

Via Twitter, a CUP follower posed the question to me of why Republican women would vote for Secretary Clinton this November in one of the most consequential presidential elections in recent memory. The glib response would be, “For the same reason some GOP men are casting their ballots for the Democratic nominee.” In fact, fifty senior Republican foreign policy advisers (predominantly men) released a letter last week outlining why they will not vote for Donald Trump. Some will support Secretary Clinton, while others are choosing to skip the presidential election altogether. John B. Bellinger III, legal adviser to Condoleezza Rice at the Bush 43 National Security Council and the State Department, drafted the letter, focusing on Trump’s lack of fitness for the presidency, rather than on his policies. Bellinger and his colleagues cited the following deficiencies in the reality TV star’s temperament: “[Trump] is unable or unwilling to separate truth from falsehood. He does not encourage conflicting views. He lacks self-control and acts impetuously. He cannot tolerate personal criticism. He has alarmed our closest allies with his erratic behavior. All of these are dangerous qualities in an individual who aspires to be president and commander in chief, with command of the U.S. nuclear arsenal.”


Some Americans, 7 percent of those polled, respond that they would not vote for a qualified woman for president.


As Justice Sandra Day O’Connor is fond of observing when asked if male and female judges decide cases differently, “A wise old man and a wise old woman will reach the same conclusion.” But our Twitter follower seems to want to know if GOP women will have particular reasons for voting for Hillary Clinton that relate to gender and partisanship. Here are five reasons that come to mind: Continue reading “Five Reasons Some GOP Women Will Vote for Hillary”

Five Reasons Some GOP Women Will Vote for Hillary

From First Lady to First Woman President? What Firsts Can Mean for Public Policy

By Barbara Perry, co-editor of 42: Inside the Presidency of Bill Clinton

June 27, 2016 was a landmark day for women, with the convergence of the presidential campaign and the U.S. Supreme Court’s final day of its term. Almost at the very moment that Hillary Clinton, wearing the mantle of the presumptive presidential nominee of a major American party, and Senator Elizabeth Warren were debuting their “sister act” in Cincinnati, “the Supremes” were handing down a landmark decision on abortion that would bolster women’s rights across the country.

clinton-warren-cropped.png
Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren’s pioneering “sister act” may signal significant shifts in public policy towards women.

The sight of Senator Warren, in a public job interview for vice-presidential candidate, and former Senator and Secretary of State Clinton standing side by side, their arms raised in a previously male-candidate victory pose, was striking. Should a Clinton-Warren ticket materialize, it could generate the kind of excitement among women that John Kennedy, running to be the first Roman Catholic president in 1960, engendered among his co-religionists. Continue reading “From First Lady to First Woman President? What Firsts Can Mean for Public Policy”

From First Lady to First Woman President? What Firsts Can Mean for Public Policy