Doc Martyn’s Sage Marketing: Reading is Power

Reading is power, because knowledge gives us the tools to think more widely about the things that confront us on a daily basis. In the aftermath of the presidential election many thousands of think pieces, blogs, articles, and much more have been written to rejoice, despair, cajole, criticize, and much else. Many of us read those pieces with minds perhaps already formed, or perhaps not completely open to new ideas. Such an approach is understandable; we seek out information that fits how we view the world or how we wish to view it. We don’t always seek out knowledge that pushes the boundaries of what we already perceive.

One of my jobs as marketing director is to introduce people to new information. Essentially, every time my team and I start marketing a new book we must seek a way to get someone to engage with content that they might not know about, be immediately interested in, or consider within the scope of their desire to know. Every book has a core audience, of course. Each author has written his or her book with that audience in mind. But there are often also audiences that do not immediately seem applicable. It is our job as marketers to find those people so that we can introduce them to the content and, we hope, expand their view of the world. Continue reading “Doc Martyn’s Sage Marketing: Reading is Power”

Doc Martyn’s Sage Marketing: Reading is Power

With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation

Yuen Yuen Ang, University of Michigan

Guo Yongchang, party secretary of a rural county in China’s Henan province, did not fit the stereotype of a corrupt Chinese official. Featured in the documentary, The Transition Period, he was revealed as an overworked and genuinely dedicated leader. Every day, he toiled from dawn to dusk, courting investors, inspecting construction projects, and resolving social conflicts, both big and small.

Yet the final seconds of the film reveals a twist: shortly before retiring, Guo was found guilty of taking bribes and sentenced to seven years in prison. Guo’s story reflects a broader reality in China: economic development and corruption goes hand-in-hand. Local leaders take on overwhelming responsibilities. They actively seek out growth opportunities for their locales, exercise power, and in the process, profit themselves too.

Once that’s understood, it’s clear that President Xi Jinping has set himself up with an impossible task: keep the economy humming under state domination, while trying to eradicate corruption. Continue reading “With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation”

With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation

It Takes a Village: Eight Tips for Surviving in the Age of Amazon

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Buffalo Street Books: saving the world, one bookstore at a time.

It’s University Press Week at AAUP, and we’re excited to participate in the annual UP Week Blog Tour. This year’s theme is “community,” and today’s posts focus on IndieBound, the community of independent bookstores. Find more great reads at our partner presses: University of Texas PressUniversity of Calgary Press, University Press of ColoradoSeminary Co-op BookstoresMcGill-Queen’s University PressDuke University PressNYU PressUniversity Press of Kentucky, and University Press of Kansas.

Next door to Greenstar, Ithaca’s cooperative natural foods market, and down the hall from the legendary Moosewood Restaurant, you’ll find Buffalo Street Books, Ithaca’s cooperatively owned bookstore. In these hard times for the publishing industry, our conspicuously literate college town of 30,000 souls (50,000 when you include Cornell and Ithaca College’s student bodies) has but four brick and mortar stand-alone bookstores left within its city limits, each staking out its territory: used and rare, science fiction and fantasy, big box, and independent new. Continue reading “It Takes a Village: Eight Tips for Surviving in the Age of Amazon”

It Takes a Village: Eight Tips for Surviving in the Age of Amazon

The Deer Is OK

City Lore 30th anniversary party
“Readings, dancing, food, wine, poets, and fans” at City Lore’s 30th anniversary party and book signing (Photo: E. B. Gallardo)

The Poetry of Everyday Life, by Steve Zeitlin, hit the stores this month. The book is a lovely meditation on the nooks and crannies of daily life where poetic moments are nestled. Throughout the book the reader meets poets who have captured and paid homage to those moments. A few weeks ago I got to hear some of those poets in person as they read from the book in a lively and jam-packed book party on the Lower East Side in Manhattan at City Lore, where Steve is founding director.


One night I had a dream in which I tried to navigate the narrative of my dream using the Word toolbars (both Standard and Formatting).


We manuscript editors spend our days with manuscripts and page proofs, e-mail and monitors; some of us don’t get out much, or at least as often as some of our colleagues in other departments. One night I had a dream in which I tried to navigate the narrative of my dream using the Word toolbars (both Standard and Formatting). So I thought, when you get an opportunity to attend an event for a book you got to know really well during the editing and production process and see what actually happens when it hits the world, along with a chance to get down to the city, it is a good idea to seize it! Continue reading “The Deer Is OK”

The Deer Is OK

The Poetry of Everyday Life and Zeitlin’s Creative Writing Prompts

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From the cover of The Poetry of Everyday Life. Photo by Martha Cooper.

Place Moments

“The places we care about are baskets that hold the perishable fruits of memory and experience. Take a notebook out to the places that you love, those places that are lush with low-hanging fruit. The moments when you encounter them mark the times when the experience is ripe for you. Savor them.” — Steve Zeitlin

Have you done it? Have you gone back to those places you once held close? Have you explored new places?

The Poetry of Everyday Life: Storytelling and the Art of Awareness, by Steve Zeitlin, defines our own lives — all of our moments, no matter how small or big—as collections of beautiful poems. Poetry can exist in breathing: the simplest thing you can do as a human being. The writing exercise mentioned above is just one example of how Zeitlin, a folklorist who devotes his time to the beauty of human communication, uses his latest project to help educators, writers, and others discover the surrounding beauty in their everyday lives. He is also the founding director of City Lore, an organization that believes in the power of grassroots voices as they tell their stories of cultural heritage. Continue reading “The Poetry of Everyday Life and Zeitlin’s Creative Writing Prompts”

The Poetry of Everyday Life and Zeitlin’s Creative Writing Prompts

White World Order, Black Power Politics Reviewed in the LRB

White World Order, Black Power Politics: The Birth of American International Relations by Robert Vitalis was reviewed by Susan Pederson in the October 20 issue of the London Review of Books: Destined to Disappear. Pederson writes: 

“Robert Vitalis wants his discipline to understand not only how central the category of race and the structures of racism were to its founding institutions and paradigms but also to see the erasure of that history not as progress but as repression, a willful forgetting that has if anything made it less equipped to comprehend (much less to address) the shocking racial inequities that still mark both the American and the global order. If international relations scholars want to understand the racial politics that made their field what it is today, there is no better place to begin than with this righteously angry book.”

White World Order, Black Power Politics Reviewed in the LRB