Give to Cornell University Press and help us change the world—one book at a time

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Contribute to the mission of Cornell University Press on Giving Day.
(University Press Gift Fund Number: 317123)

This is a crucial moment in the transformation of Cornell University Press. Never in our 148-year history have our books been more important, while the business model for the publication of primary scholarship has never been under greater siege. We are stuck between the bookends of mission and margin—embracing our role in the tenure certification process and publishing first books while exploring initiatives that will help us remain financially viable. 

Cornell University Press books won an unprecedented sixty awards across a range of disciplines in 2016. We published books such as Deadly River about the UN cover-up of the cholera epidemic in Haiti and Violence as a Generative Force detailing an unknown Bosnian genocide. We carefully craft the world’s stories such as former Japanese prime minister Naoto Kan’s book, My Nuclear Nightmare, about the Fukushima disaster. Our bestselling titles reflect the burning issues of the moment: race in America, voter fraud, grand strategy, human rights, international security, war, and nationalism. Books like these can change the world. Continue reading “Give to Cornell University Press and help us change the world—one book at a time”

Give to Cornell University Press and help us change the world—one book at a time

Doctors at War – A Modern Nonfiction Update to M*A*S*H

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Cambridge Professor Embedded in Afghanistan Military Hospital
Explores the Courage, Compassion, and Comic Tragedy of Modern War

“There is a massive propaganda industry, embraced by all institutions from schools to the press and churches, that seeks to deny the stark facts de Rond chronicles. This is why the British Ministry of Defense did not want the book published. De Rond shines a light on a reality we are not supposed to see. It is a reality, especially in an age of endless techno war, we must confront if we are to recover the human.”
—Chris Hedges, author of War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning

We weren’t supposed to read Mark de Rond’s new book Doctors at War.

A high-ranking medical officer in the British Ministry of Defense insisted de Rond write this book, and do so without fear of censorship. However, upon its completion, the ministry told de Rond it would oppose the book due to his exceptionally candid and true-to-life account of a trauma surgical team at work in the “world’s bloodiest” field hospital, Camp Bastion, in Afghanistan. Despite such pressure, Mark de Rond has chosen to publish the book.

Doctors at War tells of the highs and lows of surgical life in hard-hitting detail, bringing to life a morally ambiguous world in which good people face impossible choices, and in which routines designed to normalize experience have the unintended effect of highlighting war’s absurdity. Mark de Rond, a professor of organizational ethnography at Cambridge University, lifts the cover on a world rarely ever seen, let alone written about, and helps rebalance popular and overly heroic, adrenaline packed tales of what it is like to go to war. Here the crude and visceral coexist with the tender and affectionate, as do pleasure and guilt, kindness and cruelty, courage and cowardice, and the profound and pointless. In sum, it provides a unique insight into the lived experience of war from the point of view of good people forced to make difficult choices in an absurd environment.

Purchase Doctors at War today on our website and receive a special 30% discount. Use promo code 09CAU6.

For more information please contact Jonathan Hall: jlh98@cornell.edu

Interview with Mark de Rond:
Continue reading “Doctors at War – A Modern Nonfiction Update to M*A*S*H”

Doctors at War – A Modern Nonfiction Update to M*A*S*H

Gary Ferguson on NOTCHES and The Conversation

Gary Ferguson, author of Same-Sex Marriage in Renaissance Rome, was interviewed by Katherine Harvey on the blog NOTCHES: (re)marks on the history of sexuality. Read the interview here. Ferguson also wrote about the book on The Conversation: A same-sex marriage ceremony in . . . Renaissance Rome? (The latter piece was also picked up by the Daily Beast: Inside Renaissance-Era Rome’s Gay Marriage.)

 

 

Gary Ferguson on NOTCHES and The Conversation

Poetry to Ease the Final Passage

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Photo by Sarah Dargan

By Steve Zeitlin, author of The Poetry of Everyday Life

“We all have to face this thing sometime,” my wife’s father, Lucas Dargan, told me around the time he turned ninety-nine.

Six months later, he found himself facing precisely that “thing.” A retired forester who planted over a million trees in his lifetime, he had split wood every morning until two years before.

Tonight, he lay in a hospital bed at the McCleod hospital in Florence, South Carolina, unable to properly swallow or get out of bed unassisted. Family members took turns staying overnight with him, and this night was my turn. At one point, I thought he was sleeping. I was working on my computer, when I heard lines from a poem coming from the other side of the room:

I am dying, Egypt, dying!
Ebbs the crimson life-tide fast,
And the dark Plutonian shadows
Gather on the evening blast Continue reading “Poetry to Ease the Final Passage”

Poetry to Ease the Final Passage

With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation

By Yuen Yuen Ang, author of How China Escaped the Poverty Trap

Guo Yongchang, party secretary of a rural county in China’s Henan province, did not fit the stereotype of a corrupt Chinese official. Featured in the documentary, The Transition Period, he was revealed as an overworked and genuinely dedicated leader. Every day, he toiled from dawn to dusk, courting investors, inspecting construction projects, and resolving social conflicts, both big and small.

Yet the final seconds of the film reveals a twist: shortly before retiring, Guo was found guilty of taking bribes and sentenced to seven years in prison. Guo’s story reflects a broader reality in China: economic development and corruption goes hand-in-hand. Local leaders take on overwhelming responsibilities. They actively seek out growth opportunities for their locales, exercise power, and in the process, profit themselves too.

Once that’s understood, it’s clear that President Xi Jinping has set himself up with an impossible task: keep the economy humming under state domination, while trying to eradicate corruption. Continue reading “With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation”

With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation

White World Order, Black Power Politics Reviewed in the LRB

White World Order, Black Power Politics: The Birth of American International Relations by Robert Vitalis was reviewed by Susan Pederson in the October 20 issue of the London Review of Books: Destined to Disappear. Pederson writes: 

“Robert Vitalis wants his discipline to understand not only how central the category of race and the structures of racism were to its founding institutions and paradigms but also to see the erasure of that history not as progress but as repression, a willful forgetting that has if anything made it less equipped to comprehend (much less to address) the shocking racial inequities that still mark both the American and the global order. If international relations scholars want to understand the racial politics that made their field what it is today, there is no better place to begin than with this righteously angry book.”

White World Order, Black Power Politics Reviewed in the LRB

Recent Award Winners

Russian Hajj: Empire and the Pilgrimage to Mecca by Eileen Kane: Winner, Marshall Shulman Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Honorable mention, Reginald Zelnik Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Honorable mention, Heldt Prize for the Best Book in Slavic/Eastern European/Eurasian Women’s Studies (Association for Women in Slavic Studies)

Making Uzbekistan: Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Early USSR by Adeeb Khalid: Winner, Reginald Zelnik Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)

The Merchants of Siberia: Trade in Early Modern Eurasia by Erika Monahan: Honorable Mention, Heldt Prize for the Best Book in Slavic/Eastern European/Eurasian Women’s Studies (Association for Women in Slavic Studies)

Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery by Margaret Ellen Newell: Winner, Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize (Massachusetts Historical Society)

The Depths of Russia: Oil, Power, and Culture after Socialism by Douglas Rogers: Winner, Davis Center Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Winner, Ed A. Hewett Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Honorable Mention, Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)

The Devil’s Chain: Prostitution and Social Control in Partitioned Poland by Keely Stauter-Halsted: Winner, Heldt Prize for the Best Book in Slavic/Eastern European/Eurasian Women’s Studies (Association for Women in Slavic Studies)

 

Recent Award Winners