Gary Ferguson on NOTCHES and The Conversation

Gary Ferguson, author of Same-Sex Marriage in Renaissance Rome, was interviewed by Katherine Harvey on the blog NOTCHES: (re)marks on the history of sexuality. Read the interview here. Ferguson also wrote about the book on The Conversation: A same-sex marriage ceremony in . . . Renaissance Rome? (The latter piece was also picked up by the Daily Beast: Inside Renaissance-Era Rome’s Gay Marriage.)

 

 

Gary Ferguson on NOTCHES and The Conversation

Poetry to Ease the Final Passage

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Photo by Sarah Dargan

By Steve Zeitlin, author of The Poetry of Everyday Life

“We all have to face this thing sometime,” my wife’s father, Lucas Dargan, told me around the time he turned ninety-nine.

Six months later, he found himself facing precisely that “thing.” A retired forester who planted over a million trees in his lifetime, he had split wood every morning until two years before.

Tonight, he lay in a hospital bed at the McCleod hospital in Florence, South Carolina, unable to properly swallow or get out of bed unassisted. Family members took turns staying overnight with him, and this night was my turn. At one point, I thought he was sleeping. I was working on my computer, when I heard lines from a poem coming from the other side of the room:

I am dying, Egypt, dying!
Ebbs the crimson life-tide fast,
And the dark Plutonian shadows
Gather on the evening blast Continue reading “Poetry to Ease the Final Passage”

Poetry to Ease the Final Passage

With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation

By Yuen Yuen Ang, author of How China Escaped the Poverty Trap

Guo Yongchang, party secretary of a rural county in China’s Henan province, did not fit the stereotype of a corrupt Chinese official. Featured in the documentary, The Transition Period, he was revealed as an overworked and genuinely dedicated leader. Every day, he toiled from dawn to dusk, courting investors, inspecting construction projects, and resolving social conflicts, both big and small.

Yet the final seconds of the film reveals a twist: shortly before retiring, Guo was found guilty of taking bribes and sentenced to seven years in prison. Guo’s story reflects a broader reality in China: economic development and corruption goes hand-in-hand. Local leaders take on overwhelming responsibilities. They actively seek out growth opportunities for their locales, exercise power, and in the process, profit themselves too.

Once that’s understood, it’s clear that President Xi Jinping has set himself up with an impossible task: keep the economy humming under state domination, while trying to eradicate corruption. Continue reading “With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation”

With its corruption crackdown, China is also stamping out innovation

White World Order, Black Power Politics Reviewed in the LRB

White World Order, Black Power Politics: The Birth of American International Relations by Robert Vitalis was reviewed by Susan Pederson in the October 20 issue of the London Review of Books: Destined to Disappear. Pederson writes: 

“Robert Vitalis wants his discipline to understand not only how central the category of race and the structures of racism were to its founding institutions and paradigms but also to see the erasure of that history not as progress but as repression, a willful forgetting that has if anything made it less equipped to comprehend (much less to address) the shocking racial inequities that still mark both the American and the global order. If international relations scholars want to understand the racial politics that made their field what it is today, there is no better place to begin than with this righteously angry book.”

White World Order, Black Power Politics Reviewed in the LRB

Recent Award Winners

Russian Hajj: Empire and the Pilgrimage to Mecca by Eileen Kane: Winner, Marshall Shulman Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Honorable mention, Reginald Zelnik Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Honorable mention, Heldt Prize for the Best Book in Slavic/Eastern European/Eurasian Women’s Studies (Association for Women in Slavic Studies)

Making Uzbekistan: Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Early USSR by Adeeb Khalid: Winner, Reginald Zelnik Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)

The Merchants of Siberia: Trade in Early Modern Eurasia by Erika Monahan: Honorable Mention, Heldt Prize for the Best Book in Slavic/Eastern European/Eurasian Women’s Studies (Association for Women in Slavic Studies)

Brethren by Nature: New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery by Margaret Ellen Newell: Winner, Peter J. Gomes Memorial Book Prize (Massachusetts Historical Society)

The Depths of Russia: Oil, Power, and Culture after Socialism by Douglas Rogers: Winner, Davis Center Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Winner, Ed A. Hewett Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies); Honorable Mention, Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)

The Devil’s Chain: Prostitution and Social Control in Partitioned Poland by Keely Stauter-Halsted: Winner, Heldt Prize for the Best Book in Slavic/Eastern European/Eurasian Women’s Studies (Association for Women in Slavic Studies)

 

Recent Award Winners

Press author Sara Danius in the news

Sara Danius, author of The Senses of Modernism: Technology, Perception, and Aesthetics, is the Permanent Secretary of the Swedish Academy, which awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature to Bob Dylan today  “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.”

Bob Dylan wins 2016 Nobel Prize in literature—live updates from the Guardian 

Bob Dylan Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature (New York Times)

Press author Sara Danius in the news